UFORIA: Blind Nutrition versus Designer Nutrition
Demetrice Etheridge
Think, Act, Talk and Conduct Yourself Like the Person You Want to Become. Read More...

Retired United States Navy as a LDO Communications Officer (6420) with over 24 years of experience in the field of communications. Served as an officer technical specialist in automatic data processing and digital communication technology; provided direct supervision of programmers and telecommunications personnel concerned with the installation, operation, and maintenance of data systems including hardware and software operating and application programs; developed local area network design specifications and connections to Wide Area Networks including system requirements, band width specifications, and technical requirements; provided system analysis and evaluation and system administration including beta testing, troubleshooting, traffic control, and system training; developed policy for data processing and communication priorities, evaluation methods, work standards, and procedure manuals for technicians; provided leadership, professional counseling, and career guidance for team members; prepared technical reports and provided advice to Senior Naval Leadership on data processing and communication matters; prepared budgets and performed cost analysis for computer and communication operations; supervised data processing and communication and needs assessment for personnel, logistics, intelligence and operational requirements for tactical and non-tactical operations; ensured data integrity, system security, inventory control, and Total Quality Management; maintained records and documentation; prepared personnel evaluation reports.

Specialties: Customer Relationship Specialists. I utilize information age marketing to set myself apart from others by sharing a lucrative solution to a complicated online marketing world.

What are single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)?

Single nucleotide polymorphisms, frequently called SNPs (pronounced “snips”), are the most common type of genetic variation among people. Each SNP represents a difference in a single DNA building block, called a nucleotide. For example, a SNP may replace the nucleotide cytosine (C) with the nucleotide thymine (T) in a certain stretch of DNA.

SNPs occur normally throughout a person’s DNA. They occur almost once in every 1,000 nucleotides on average, which means there are roughly 4 to 5 million SNPs in a person's genome. These variations may be unique or occur in many individuals; scientists have found more than 100 million SNPs in populations around the world. Most commonly, these variations are found in the DNA between genes. They can act as biological markers, helping scientists locate genes that are associated with disease. When SNPs occur within a gene or in a regulatory region near a gene, they may play a more direct role in disease by affecting the gene’s function.

Most SNPs have no effect on health or development. Some of these genetic differences, however, have proven to be very important in the study of human health. Researchers have found SNPs that may help predict an individual’s response to certain drugs, susceptibility to environmental factors such as toxins, and risk of developing particular diseases. SNPs can also be used to track the inheritance of disease genes within families. Future studies will work to identify SNPs associated with complex diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

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